Friday October 27, 2017

How to Choose Energy Efficient Windows for your Home

October 23, 2018 is ENERGY STAR® Day! Milgard is proud to be an ENERGY STAR partner by manufacturing high-quality windows and patio doors that adhere to ENERGY STAR requirements.

Tested to be an ENERGY STAR Partner

Did you know that ENERGY STAR products are independently certified? Each partner must go through rigorous testing to ensure their products save energy without sacrificing features or functionality. When you see the ENERGY STAR label, that’s a sign that the product can save you money on your energy bills, which can also help protect our environment.

ENERGY STAR Saves Money

How do ENERGY STAR Windows Help?

Windows and patio doors that carry the ENERGY STAR logo are designed to meet tough thermal and solar requirements where you live. Improved energy performance helps you enjoy a more comfortable home year round. Old windows can be leaky and poorly insulated which results in energy loss as you spend money to heat or cool your home.

What Should I Look for in an Energy Efficient Window?

What Should I Look for in an Energy Efficient Window?

When shopping for energy efficient windows and patio doors, consider the following:

  • Number of Panes: Many older windows only have a single pane of glass. Newer, more energy efficient windows offer dual or triple pane glass (or glazing). This provides better insulation and helps to reduce energy usage.
  • Low-E Glass Coatings: Low-E stands for “low emissivity”. That refers to the solar control of the glass regarding its ability to improve thermal performance. Homes with Low-E glass windows and doors enjoy more consistent temperatures all year long. Plus, your carpet and furniture can find protection against UV rays which can cause colors to fade. Milgard offers SunCoat® (Low-E2) and SunCoatMAX® (Low-E3) coatings for better levels of protection.
  • 4th Surface Glass Coating: Consider adding a 4th Surface coating to your double-pane windows to enhance the U-factor (how well a window can withstand heat). Ours is a durable Transparent Conductive Oxide (TCO) coating that actually reflects heat back into the home.
  • Window Spacers: Spacers keep a window’s dual glass panes the correct distance apart which aids in insulation. You need just the right amount of air space to ensure the proper efficiencies. Milgard® EdgeGard® spacers not only offer superior insulating properties, but also help reduce condensation. Or, choose EdgeGardMAX®, an advanced design that can actually stop the heat flow while reducing condensation and improving energy efficiency.
  • Gas-filled Space Between Glass Panes: Milgard uses either Argon or Krypton gas between the panes to enhance thermal performance while still maintaining your view. Argon is standard. Choose Krypton for the highest levels of thermal protection.
  • Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC): The SHGC is measuring the amount of solar radiation that can be transmitted through a window. The lower the number, the better. 

If you are ready to help your home become more energy efficient and want to learn more about ENERGY STAR replacement windows, download our Energy Brochure or find a Milgard Certified Dealer near you today.

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Comments

Edgegard MAX spacer discrepancy

Can you please explain why the definition of the Edgegard MAX spacer in the four page Milgard produced brochure supplied to window dealers across the United States, which touts the benefits of the Edgegard MAX all foam, non metal spacer, is different from the very general spacer description currently found on your company website? Does it have anything to do with the legal filing from 2010 that patents/trademarks the name Edgegard MAX for use as a description for both a metal and a non metal all foam spacer as you see fit?

I recently placed a large order for a residential replacement window and slider project, and was very specific with my salesman in asking for the upgrade to the Edgegard MAX non metal, foam spacer. What arrived were windows and sliders with Intercept metal spacers with desiccant inside. Is this an error on the part of the factory, or is this what Milgard is currently speccing as the Edgegard MAX? And if that’s the case, why? Is it because with the desiccant inside the spacer it soaks up condensation when window seals fail, making it harder to notice that they have, in fact failed? Which I suppose would result in fewer warranty claims, wouldn’t it? Or am I just being paranoid? I would very much appreciate a response from Milgard, defining what, exactly, customers specifying the Edgegard MAX spacer can expect.

Thanks for reaching out, we

Thanks for reaching out, we would like into this for you. Please email me at social@milgard.com. Thank you. 

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Contributors

Sashes + Glass is a blog developed to guide you through the window and patio door buying process. From frame style to color, we want to help you set the tone for your house with beautiful windows in the hope that it will bring joy to your living space.
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Joann Whetstine
Brand Manager

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Joan Custer
Marketing Specialist

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Lois Jones
Senior Marketing Specialist